Globe Education Academy: Day 8

Day 8 started with Voice.  Sarah’s goal was to give us pointers for outside voices (to help with our performance) and class control.

Sarah told us that “the Globe isn’t outdoors–it’s a theater without a roof.”  We would benefit from the fact that the Globe is intimate and enclosed.  That said, there were some tricks she wanted us to remember for being on stage:

  • Articulation is key.  Your intention needs to be clear and your direction (both physical and vocal) needs to be clear.
  • You cannot wander.  You cannot let your head float.  Turn your head and body together. You have to direct your audience.
  • If it is very noisy (an airplane flying overhead, for instance), give yourself a break.

As for voice and class control:

  • Prepare your voice daily.  It will last longer and help you be heard.
  • The daily semi-supine position will help you find your breath, relax, and cultivate a sense of calm.
  • Proper alignment and straight posture is key.
  • Don’t lock your knees — it affects the voice by stopping the breath.
  • Quiet, firm speech is more likely to get people’s attention (vs. raising one’s voice).
  • Make them come to you.  Don’t go to them.
  • Think about the value of silence.
  • No one can compete with 30 young kids.  A quiet, positive voice will bring calm.  Be very clear.  Imbue your words with color (pitch/range).  Think before you speak (this gives time to calm yourself).
  • When you’re sick: Use steam for sore throats.

Then it was off to Movement with Gylnn!  After a really good stretch, Glynn had us do a run-through of our scenes so that she could see them.  Then it was time for sitting in a circle for a pep talk to get us ready for the evening performance.

That evening, we had thirty minutes with Margo to calm our nerves and four hours of rehearsal to finalize our performances.  Then it was off to the Globe stage!

P1080491I actually walked onto stage without feeling nervous.  It was amazing.  I hate being up in front of people.  Once, I had to present something at a conference in front of 1000 people, and I couldn’t eat all day.  This, though?  I had been so well prepared by everyone at Globe Education that I was just ready.

Yes, I forgot a line — which completely frustrated me.  I knew my lines cold, and I had since our first rehearsal.  I think I got so caught up in the moment that I looked at Helen (playing Tranio) and it just went right from my head.  This is where I learned to true value of team work, Helen picked up with the next line and the scene was saved.  I was able to get right back into things and stay in character, all because my teammate had my back.

I applied to this program, because I wanted to challenge myself.  I wanted to do something that I was completely not comfortable doing.  Traveling without my husband to London, spending two and a half weeks with people I barely knew ahead of time, and standing on a stage acting pushed me out of my comfort zone and taught me a lot about myself and about teaching:

  • Being comfortable in front of a crowd isn’t necessarily a personality trait.  It’s something that we have to build as teachers.  The practitioners at the Globe provided a safe, nurturing environment where I felt comfortable taking risks.  They then provided structured practice time so that we could practice our performance until we were all on the same page and knew our parts cold.  As a teacher, I’m constantly asking my students to get up in front of the class and give presentations, but I’m not sure if I do as good of a job making that as effortless for them as the Globe did for me.
  • When I was on stage, I knew that my team had my back and that we could get through any difficulties.  When things didn’t go as planned, they were able to pick up the slack and the performance moved on.  There were hugs backstage at the end of the performance.  We were a team, and we had grown close not only because we had a common goal and had spent so much time together, but because our director made sure from the beginning to do acting games and warm-ups to start developing that sense of team.  She said that this was a play, and that we would play together.  I think that’s a lovely idea to bring into teaching.  My students work in “teams” all the time, but how often do I let them play together in order for them to build the trust that they need to actually work together?

I’m so glad that I applied to this program.  I’m glad that I was able to stretch myself as an individual, and that I was able to learn so much from some great teachers.  You too can apply by clicking here.

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